Agile Zone is brought to you in partnership with:

Gil Zilberfeld has been in software since childhood, writing BASIC programs on his trusty Sinclair ZX81. With more than twenty years of developing commercial software, he has vast experience in software methodology and practices. Gil is an agile consultant, applying agile principles over the last decade. From automated testing to exploratory testing, design practices to team collaboration, scrum to kanban, and lean startup methods – he’s done it all. He is still learning from his successes and failures. Gil speaks frequently in international conferences about unit testing, TDD, agile practices and communication. He is the author of "Everyday Unit Testing", blogs at http://www.gilzilberfeld.com and in his spare time he shoots zombies, for fun. Gil is a DZone MVB and is not an employee of DZone and has posted 70 posts at DZone. You can read more from them at their website. View Full User Profile

The Better Side Of Anger

03.25.2013
| 2058 views |
  • submit to reddit
It was the nth time that a supplier has failed us. If we analyze it logically, there were two options: Get mad or roll with the punches.

Since we’re not Vulcan, it’s not really a logical choice: what we felt is anger, defeat. Or both.

Can’t do much with defeat. But anger is totally different.

From childhood, we’re taught that anger is a “negative emotion”. It’s counter productive. It’s not effective.

That’s a lie.

First thing, we can’t control feeling anger more than we can control feeling happy. Emotions are emotions and cannot be controlled. What maybe ineffective is our behavior based on these emotions. And we are fully able to control behavior. So maybe it’s not effective to stand in the room full of people, shout in anger at your boss, threatening to quit. (Tried it, jury’s still out about how effective it really was).

Because anger is “bad”, we don’t talk about how anger opens the door to innovation and creativity. When you’re pissed, you’re starting to think about other options. What you can do differently.

So we can replace that supplier. We can readjust our work with them. Or divert money we spend to do stuff ourselves.

We can try something else that we didn’t think was possible, because what happened until now was acceptable. Just the way it is.

Few years ago, I got angry that another  build was thrown back to the development by the testers. We’ve introduced smoke tests. We changed the way worked because we were angry. (Ok, I got angry).

Anger is not a negative emotion. Don’t be afraid of it. Don’t contain it.

What you do with it maybe life-changing.

You
Published at DZone with permission of Gil Zilberfeld, author and DZone MVB. (source)

(Note: Opinions expressed in this article and its replies are the opinions of their respective authors and not those of DZone, Inc.)